Star Power

ALL-TIME AMERICAN WRITERS TOURNAMENT

Misty-Copelandunder armor

(Ad photo of Misty Copeland for Under Armor.)
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Should writers just write?

Should ballet dancers just dance?

Ballet has been most popular– and most relevant– when it had stars to put out front. Most famously, the star pairing of Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev in the 1960’s.

Today ballet has Misty Copeland, prima ballerina at New York City’s American Ballet Theatre. Walk into any Macy’s store and you encounter a large poster of Misty Copeland. She appears in TV commercial after TV commercial, on the cover of magazine after magazine. Feature articles everywhere.

The result? Ballet matters. Little girls grow up dreaming of being the next Misty Copeland. Dance schools are filled– a flow of new talent streaming into the art.

Think about it: The marginal art of ballet(!) has developed a more prominent personality, a more important cultural phenomenon, than the entirety of literature with all its schools, publishing companies and publicity departments. This is failure, people. Across-the-board failure.

American literature once had stars. Our goal as a literary project is to find or create new ones. Specifically, the Great American Writer.

This tournament is our way of resetting the standards and examining the nature of literary star power.

One thought on “Star Power

  1. Performance art has always been more appealing to audiences than creative art. Painters have the same problems writers do. Getting people to listen to good modern music is difficult. We have to go back to Ancient Greece to find a large audience for drama. I’m not saying it wouldn’t be good if writers could connect to their readers, but unfortunately the odds seem slim. Of course, NYC has the leeway to sell literature and visual art, but the writer or painter who is excluded from NYC finds it impossible to make headway. If someone could come up with a way to do that, we who do our work in silence and out of sight would be a whole lot happier.

    Liked by 1 person

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